Date: December 10, 2018 | Category: News

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Date: December 10, 2018 | Category: News

Joy Guymon, of Sedalia, became the new Pettis County Care Manager on Nov. 5.
She replaced Shery Fogle, who now splits her time as Lifestyles Specialist and Parkview Gardens Apartments Care Manager in Warrensburg.
Joy, who has a bachelor’s of social work from University of Central Missouri, began in the field more than 15 years ago.
She worked at WILS and the Center for Human Services. In addition, she works on an as-needed basis for Citizens Against Spousal Abuse in Sedalia.
She and her husband, Brian, also are host home providers. The couple provides support in their home to an adult woman who lives with them and needs special assistance.
Joy said she believes that she is a good fit for the Care Manager’s role.
“I love having knowledge that can be used to empower others to be the most independent people they can be. I am a compassionate person who loves to help others,” she said. “I truly believe that we all need help from time to time, but most of us don’t need someone to do for us, only the information of how it can be done. I use this philosophy in my everyday life and with people I serve. I am a strong advocate for those who are underprivileged, and I feel it is my duty to advocate for those who do not have their own voice.”
After living on a mini-farm in rural Sedalia for 28 years, Joy and her husband recently moved into a larger home so that they would have more room to house more individuals who need a family-supported environment.  
During her first few weeks at Care Connection, Joy said she has taken quite a liking to the older adults she has met.
“I like hearing the cool stories that seniors are eager to share if a person is willing to listen,” Joy said. “I love, love, love being able to open doors of opportunity for someone in need.”
Going forward, Joy said, she hopes to bring increased awareness to the agency’s services and thus increase the number of people she serves. She said she wants to connect with community partners.
When she is not at work, Joy enjoys art as a professional photographer and an impressionist painter.
She and her husband have four children, Aaron, Telisha, Kallen, and Billie; and five grandchildren, Draven, Korvin, Reanna, Wyatt, and Ethan.
The couple also has a family dog named Jack (“Jackson if he is in trouble),” and cats Chloe and Bella.”

Date: December 10, 2018 | Category: News

Pearl Weaver, of Warrensburg, mother of Care Manager Shery Fogle, has received state recognition as Caregiver of the Month for November.
Shery nominated Pearl because of her dedication to caring for her husband of 57 years, Gary (Shery’s father.) The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services recognizes one caregiver a month and from those nominees, will name a caregiver of the year.
Retirees Gary and Pearl have worked as campground hosts for the past 10 years from April through October, when they leave home and live in a camper. As campground hosts, they greet people, answer questions and sign people into their camping sites – meeting many interesting people along the way.
Gary’s health has been declining for the past five years, and Pearl has taken on caregiving duties, including checking Gary’s blood sugar and administering his insulin and other medications. Pearl also helps Gary with bathing and grooming and encourages him to be as independent as possible.
Since July, Gary has been in and out of the hospital and spent more than a month in a skilled nursing home. Pearl tended to the campground by day and her husband by night, visiting him and wrapping his legs to treat cellulitis.
Gary was released from the nursing home Oct. 29, and he and Pearl returned home to Warrensburg. With Pearl providing excellent care for Gary, they are still able to remain active.
They attend all the home games of the University of Central Missouri’s volleyball and basketball teams. The Weavers also attend potlucks twice a month and play cards at the Warrensburg Senior Center. They frequently visit with their children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren.
Pearl said the most important attributes for caregivers are to know how to love, be patient and give encouragement. “Caregiving takes a lot of time and patience, but you do what you have to do,” she said.
November marks the second time this year that the agency’s Care Management team has successfully nominated a family caregiver of the month.
Henry County Care Manager Roy Qualls nominated Doris Hudgens, who received recognition in April.

Date: November 29, 2018 | Category: News

Click here to see the offerings from our friends at the Caregiver Teleconnection.
The first one, on December 3, will address the special challenges of caregiving during the holidays.

Date: November 29, 2018 | Category: News

As we head toward the end of the year, the Missouri SMP (Senior Medicare Patrol) wants to offer some tips on avoiding scams when you make charitable donations. These tips are from the Federal Trade Commission:
If you are considering giving to a specific charity, do an online search with the name of the charity and the words “complaint,” “review,” “rating,” or “scam.”
Don’t make any donations in cash or gift card, or by wiring money. Pay using a credit card or check.
Keep a record of donations, and reconcile with your records to make sure you are charged for only what you agreed to donate.
If you feel rushed or pressured into making a donation, don’t do it.
If you receive a “thank you” for a donation you never made, don’t send the donation.
Don’t think that a phone call from a local number is necessarily local. Scammers can change caller ID to any number they want, even law enforcement or the IRS.
Make certain that you know specifically what the donation will pay for.
Don’t fall for an offer of sweepstakes winnings in exchange for a donation. It’s an illegal scam.
Any red flags or uncertainty should make you consider giving to a different charity.
Report scams to FTC.gov/complaint and the Missouri Attorney General’s office. Check out these organizations that can help you research charities: BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator, Charity Watch, and GuideStarck. All have websites.
As always, report suspected Medicare fraud or abuse to the Missouri SMP (Senior Medicare Patrol) at (888)515-6565.
This project was supported, in part by grant number 90MPPG0040, from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.

Date: November 22, 2018 | Category: News

Care Connection Nutrition Eric Messer found this recipe from the American Heart Association for spaghetti sauce that is very similar to what he makes at home. This is paired with spaghetti squash for a heart healthy, satisfying winter dish. He says you can use a low sodium spaghetti/pasta sauce in place of making your own, Spaghetti squash, like many other winter squash, are good sources of vitamins A, B1, C, folic acid, potassium and dietary fiber.

Spaghetti Squash with Homemade marina
Servings 4
•1 spaghetti squash (3 pounds)
•non-stick Cooking spray
Sauce:
•1 tsp. extra virgin olive oil
•1 clove fresh garlic (minced) OR 1 tsp. jarred, minced garlic
•1/2 small onion (chopped)
•1 cup tomatoes (diced) OR 8 oz. canned, no-salt-added, diced tomatoes
•1/4 tsp. black pepper
•1/4 tsp. dried, salt-free herbs, Italian blend
•1/8 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
•16 oz. canned, no salt added tomato sauce
•1/2 cup fresh mozzarella, cut into bite-size pieces
•1/4 cup coarsely chopped, or, torn basil OR 1 tsp. dried basil
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
2. Cut spaghetti squash in half. On a baking sheet coated with cooking spray, place halves of squash face down and bake for 1 hour or until tender.
3. Heat oil in medium saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and onion and cook until soft, about 5-7 minutes. Add diced tomatoes, pepper, herbs and red pepper flakes. Cook until liquid is evaporated, about 2-3 minutes. Add tomato sauce and reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes.
4. Let squash sit at room temperature until just cool enough to handle. Take a fork and scrap flesh from outside working in, creating “spaghetti noodles”.
5. Add squash “noodles” to sauce and remove from heat. Toss with mozzarella and fresh basil and serve.
Servings 4 1 spaghetti squash (3 pounds)

Date: November 15, 2018 | Category: News

We at Care Connection enjoy taking a moment to reflect on the ways in which we meet our mission. We look at times when our team members get the joy and satisfaction of helping the older adults we serve. We call them Mission Moments, and we have decide to begin sharing them with you all.
This one comes from Regional Ombudsman Director Kathy Ray-Smith, whose job is to make sure that residents of long-term care have their rights protected:
She recently received a call from a social worker in Wyoming regarding vulnerable, frail elderly man who had been left at the hospital in that state. The man had been traveling all over the country. He got sick, and his friend dropped him off at the hospital and left him there. He had no insurance.
The man told the social worker he wanted to return to Chariton County because he had lived in Mendon, but he had no funds to travel. The hospital was willing to transport him if he could find a long-term care home in Chariton County. Kathy gave the social worker information on a Brunswick nursing home.
Chariton County Care Manager Robyn Kistler was instrumental in getting the Wyoming hospital the paperwork to get the man’s Medicaid started in Missouri. That’s one reason the nursing home was willing to accept him. Kathy has since received reports the man is safe, sound and happy in a Chariton County nursing home.
This is a great example of two team members from different Care Connection programs working together to solve a dilemma. The man is in a Brunswick nursing home. His deepest wishes were answered.

Date: November 8, 2018 | Category: News

Missouri SMP advises seniors to save Social Security cards, shred old Medicare cards
Medicare beneficiaries in Missouri should be getting their new Medicare cards with a unique numbers on them through the mail soon. The Medicare cards replace the old ones that contain a Social Security number.
The Missouri SMP (Senior Medicare Patrol) advises seniors to put the new card in a safe place and shred the old red, white and blue Medicare cards. However, seniors should still keep their blue Social Security cards. Don’t destroy your blue Social Security cards. Keep them in a safe place as always. As always, if you suspect Medicare fraud, call the SMP at 1-888-515-6565.

This project was supported, in part by grant number 90MPPG0040, from the U.S. Administration for Communi-ty Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.

Date: November 8, 2018 | Category: News

Care Connection once again will help people of all ages enroll in the Health Insurance Marketplace through the open enrollment period, which ends Dec. 15.
The agency has set an enrollment event from 2 to 6 p.m. Nov. 26 at the James C. Kirkpatrick Library, Room 1468, on the University of Central Missouri campus in Warrensburg. People need to bring the Social Security numbers and income information for everyone in the house.
The agency has several licensed “navigators” who can provide one-on-one assistance to people who need help to register on the online Marketplace; compare health plans that are available in Missouri; price coverage; determine whether they would qualify for income tax credits based upon their incomes; and understand benefits.
People who cannot make it to that event may call Samantha Schnell at 1-800-748-7826 to arrange for one-on-one enrollment help.
This enrollment season will be the sixth year that the agency has provided this service since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.
Care Connection provides impartial information and services without charge to consumers. The agency does not endorse or sell any particular policies or companies.

Date: November 8, 2018 | Category: News

Winter appears to have arrived early in West Central Missouri, so we are bringing you tips from the National Institutes of Health for staying warm in cold weather:
Indoors
–Set your heat to at least 68 to 70 degrees. To save on heating bills, close off rooms you are not using. Close the vents and shut the doors in these rooms, and keep the basement door closed. Place a rolled towel in front of all doors to keep out drafts.
–Make sure your house isn’t losing heat through windows. Keep your blinds and curtains closed. If you have gaps around the windows, use weather stripping or caulk to keep the cold air out.
–Dress warmly on cold days even if you are staying home. Throw a blanket over your legs. Wear socks and slippers.
–When you go to sleep, wear long underwear under your pajamas, and use extra covers. Wear a cap or hat.
–Make sure you eat enough food to keep up your weight. If you don’t eat well, you might have less fat under your skin. Body fat helps you to stay warm.
–Drink alcohol moderately, if at all.
–Ask family or friends to check on you during cold weather. If a power outage leaves you without heat, try to stay with a relative or friend.
Outdoors:
–Dress for the weather if you have to go out on chilly, cold, or damp days.
–Wear loose layers of clothing. The air between the layers helps to keep you warm.
–Put on a hat and scarf. You lose a lot of body heat when your head and neck are uncovered.
–Wear a waterproof coat or jacket if it’s snowy.
–Change your clothes right away if they get damp or wet.
Care Connection care managers may be able to put you in touch with agencies that can help you make your home warmer in winter or get assistance with utility bills for low income individuals. Call us to find out.
Source: National Institutes on Health