Date: June 18, 2019 | Category: News

Click here for a PDF copy of the Teleconnection offerings for caregivers in July.

Date: June 18, 2019 | Category: News

Do You:
–Have a skill that you would like to share with others?
–Have some extra time?
–Have the desire to serve within your community?
–Enjoy helping those who need you?
If so, we may have just the opportunity for you.
A part of Senior Corps, RSVP is America’s largest volunteer network for people 55 and over. You choose how much and where you want to serve, how much time you want to give and whether you want to share skills you have or develop new ones. RSVP shows you how you can apply the skills and wisdom you’ve acquired throughout your life to make a positive difference in the lives of others.
For more information, or to volunteer in Johnson County, contact Cindy Holmberg, RSVP Assistant, (660) 723-2021, cholmberg@goaging.org or information@goaging.org.
We also operate the RSVP program in Benton, Cedar, Henry, Hickory and St. Clair counties. If you have questions, let us know!

Date: June 6, 2019 | Category: News

The Korth Center will present a Senior Health Expo from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. June 13 at the senior center, 309 W. Englewood, in Stockton.
The workshop, presented by Care Connection for Aging Services, is meant to educate people about the many health screenings and tests covered by Medicare at no cost to the patient, as well as give tips on talking to the doctor.
To present the workshop, Care Connection has partnered with CLAIM, the Missouri State Health Insurance Assistance Program, which provides free, unbiased advocacy, education and assistance to people with Medicare.
The presentations also will provide information to equip patients to ask the right questions and have productive conversations with their doctors.
“It’s very important that people take advantage of the preventive benefits that Medicare offers as they maintain their health,” said Rona McNally, Care Connection Director of Special Projects. “We are hoping that by getting the information about how to talk their doctors, individuals will begin the discussions they need to access the benefits. Some people might not have extreme comfort in talking to the doctor and asking for things, and we believe this is a very important conversation to have.”
Medicare-covered preventive services include screenings for heart ailments, cancer, bone density, diabetes, hepatitis, obesity and more.
A Care Connection benefits counselor will be on hand to screen participants to see if they are eligible for programs that help pay for health care.
The Senior Health Expo will include written materials to take home, plus giveaways and refreshments. The event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served at the center beginning at 11:30 a.m. Those 60 and older may have lunch for a contribution, and younger individuals may pay the entire cost of the meal, about $7.50.

This material has been created or produced by CLAIM with financial assistance, in whole or part, through a grant from the Administration for Community Living. Funding is administered through the Missouri Department of Insurance, Financial Institutions and Professional Registration and service is provided by Primaris Foundation, a non-profit organization.

Date: June 6, 2019 | Category: News

The Rivers Crossing Life Center will present a Senior Health Expo from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. June 11 at the senior center, 5215 Business Highway 13 NE in Osceola.
The workshop, presented by Care Connection for Aging Services, is meant to educate people about the many health screenings and tests that Medicare covers at no cost to the patient, as well as give tips on talking to the doctor.
To present the workshop, Care Connection has partnered with CLAIM, the Missouri State Health Insurance Assistance Program, which provides free, unbiased advocacy, education and assistance to people with Medicare.
The presentations also will provide information to equip patients to ask the right questions and have productive conversations with their doctors.
“It’s very important that people take advantage of the preventive benefits that Medicare offers as they maintain their health,” said Rona McNally, Care Connection Director of Special Projects. “We are hoping that by getting the information about how to talk their doctors, individuals will begin the discussions they need to access the benefits. Some people might not have extreme comfort in talking to the doctor and asking for things, and we believe this is a very important conversation to have.”
A Care Connection benefits counselor will be on hand to screen participants to see if they are eligible for programs that help pay for health care.
The Senior Health Expo will include written materials to take home, plus giveaways and refreshments. The event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served at the center beginning at 11:30 a.m. Those 60 and older may have lunch for a contribution, and younger individuals may pay the entire cost of the meal, about $7.50.
If you have questions, please call 1-800-748-7826 or visit www.goaging.org.
This material has been created or produced by CLAIM with financial assistance, in whole or part, through a grant from the Administration for Community Living. Funding is administered through the Missouri Department of Insurance, Financial Institutions and Professional Registration and service is provided by Primaris Foundation, a non-profit organization.

Date: June 6, 2019 | Category: News

Are you interested in learning how to live well with challenges such as high blood pressure or diabetes? If so, Care Connection for Aging Services has just the class for you.
Care Connection’s Concordia Senior Center is hosting a “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Disease” class beginning at 9 a.m. on June 12. The course consists of six weekly sessions of two and a half hours each. The classes will be at the center, 710 Main, in Concordia. Certified facilitators Shery Fogle and Liz Rooks will lead the classes. The sessions are free, but registration is required by calling Care Connection Lifestyles Specialist Shery Fogle at 1-800-748-7826.
Regina Haynie recently finished a six-week CDSMP class in Clinton, and says she would “absolutely” recommend the course to people who have chronic conditions.
Haynie lives with two chronic conditions, both diagnosed just after the death of her husband.
“People with chronic conditions feel isolated and alone,” Haynie said. “By getting us together in a group, we were able to share some of our concerns, open up about concerns, and learn how others deal with it. Then you know you are not alone.”
The proven practices for self-management are based on an ongoing series of studies conducted at Stanford University School of Medicine.
Topics include:
–Techniques to deal with problems such as frustration, fatigue, pain and isolation.
–Appropriate exercise for maintaining and improving strength, flexibility and endurance.
–Appropriate use of medications.
–Communicating effectively with family, friends, and health professionals.
–Nutrition.
–Decision making.
–Evaluation of new treatments.
Sharon and Walter Johnson, of Warsaw, also attended the Clinton class.
“For the two of us, it was more reinforcement we were doing the right thing,” said Sharon, who has lived with chronic pain for 31 years. “There were a lot of good resources.”
Materials, including the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions,” will be provided. The book contains information and tips to help people manage chronic conditions daily while doing the things they need and want to do.
Participants make weekly action plans, share experiences, and help each other solve problems they encounter in creating and carrying out their self-management program.
“Doing the weekly plans made us stop and think about what you are doing right and what you need to improve on,” Sharon Johnson said.
Walter Johnson lives with diabetes and high blood pressure. He said the course “made you be honest with yourself. You had to make yourself stick to the plan. It’s easy to set up a plan, for your own health, and your own future health, but it’s harder to stick to it and be honest with yourself.”
To register, call the center at 660-463-7393 or the Central Office at 1-800-748-7826.

Date: June 4, 2019 | Category: News, Uncategorized

Sharing directly from the Office of Inspector General of Social Security
The Inspector General of Social Security, Gail S. Ennis, is warning the public about a new variation of increasingly common government employee impersonation scams, this time involving the Social Security Advisory Board. The Advisory Board has reported that individuals are receiving scam phone calls displaying the board’s phone number on caller ID. The callers are reportedly attempting to obtain personal information, including Social Security numbers. If you receive this type of call, you should not engage with the caller or provide personal information or money in response to requests or threats.

These callers are employing tactics similar to impersonation schemes involving the IRS, SSA, and the SSA OIG. Inspector General Ennis advises that callers may use a variety of false scenarios or threats to obtain personal information or payments, often requested through gift cards or prepaid debit cards.

However, the Social Security Advisory Board typically does not contact the general public to request personal information over the phone. Moreover, government employees will never threaten you to obtain personal information or payments. In those cases, the call is fraudulent, and you should just hang up.

“This caller-ID spoofing scheme has unfortunately evolved to include the Social Security Advisory Board, but it is the same type of scam, attempting to mislead people by using the trusted name of Social Security,” Inspector General Ennis said. “I encourage everyone to alert your family and friends about how common these scams are, and to be very cautious when speaking with unknown callers, even if you recognize the caller ID.”

Inspector General Ennis urges the public not to provide sensitive information over the phone or internet unless you are certain of who is receiving it. You should also never wire money or add money to a prepaid debit card to pay for any official government service.

If you receive a suspicious call, you may report that information online at https://oig.ssa.gov/report or by calling (800) 269-0271, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also report these scams to the Federal Trade Commission through a new site specific to Social Security scams: https://identitytheft.gov/ssa.

Date: May 29, 2019 | Category: News

One in 10 Americans ages 65 and older has dementia. Are you one?
Care Connection for Aging Services is providing free, confidential screenings in all 13 counties in June to help older adults answer that question.
The brief screenings will help older adults determine whether they are experiencing everyday forgetfulness or whether they need to see a physician for diagnosis and potential treatment.
Screenings are good for people who have concerns about memory loss or whose family and friends have noticed changes; they also provide guidance for future comparisons.
“These screenings give people a baseline, and if they do them year after year, they can compare the results,” said Marilyn Gunter, Director of Care Management for Care Connection. “We also want to increase the awareness of the growing issue of dementia.”
The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America estimates 5.7 million Americans are living with dementia, and the likelihood of experiencing symptoms increases as people age: 3 percent of people age 65-74, 17 percent of people age 75-84, and 32 percent of people age 85 and older have dementia. With some10,000 Americans are turning 65 every day, the professional aging network is faced with a serious situation.
Gunter said that’s why Care Connection’s care managers have made the screenings an annual focus. Participants will be asked a series of questions and screened based on their answers. If a participant’s answers signal the need for further evaluation, the care manager will offer to contact the person’s physician with the screening results.
Screenings are a significant first step toward detection of memory problems, but they are not a diagnosis. Some memory problems can be readily detected – such as those caused by vitamin deficiencies or thyroid problems. Other problems may result from causes that are not reversible, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Nonetheless, treatments can slow the progression of the disease.
Here are some warning signs of dementia, according to the foundation: trouble with new memories; relying on memory helpers; trouble finding words; struggling to complete familiar actions; confusion about time, place or people; misplacing familiar objects; onset of new depression; making bad decisions; personality changes; loss of interest in important responsibilities; seeing or hearing things; and expressing false beliefs.
Here are some questions to help decide whether you need to be screened:
–Am I becoming more forgetful?
–Do I have trouble concentrating?
–Do I sometimes forget where I am?
–Have people told me that I am repeating questions or saying the same thing over and over?
–Have I gotten lost in a familiar neighborhood?

Here is a list of when and where the screenings are available. Contact the care manager or call the center to see whether you need an appointment.

BATES COUNTY (Artricia Lowry)
Butler Senior Center, 611 W. Mill St., Butler, 660-679-5830, June 10, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 to 2 p.m.
Kern Center, 613 E. Park Ave., Rich Hill, 417-395-2225, June 11, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
BENTON COUNTY: (Dee Locke)
Cole Camp Senior Center, 206 E. Junge St., Cole Camp, 660-668-2352, June 17, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Warsaw Senior Center/Harbor Village, 17571 N. Dam Access Road, Warsaw, 660-438-3300, June 20, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
CARROLL COUNTY: (Robyn Kistler)
Carroll County Care Connection, 200 Lifecare Lane, Carrollton, 660-542-0399; date is to be determined because of flooding conditions.
CEDAR COUNTY: (Katie Hunter)
El Dorado Springs Senior Center, 604 S. Forest, El Dorado Springs, 417-876-5574, June 12, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Korth Center, 309 W. Englewood, Stockton, 417-276-5306, June 11, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
CHARITON COUNTY: (Robyn Kistler)
Salisbury Senior Center, 304 Broadway, Salisbury, 660-388-5431, June 14, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
HENRY COUNTY: (Roy Qualls)
Clinton Senior Center, 970 E. Sedalia, Clinton, 660-885-3482, June 7, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Windsor Senior Center, 201 S. Main, Windsor, 660-647-3224, June 5, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
HICKORY COUNTY: (Melanie Foster)
McCarty Senior Center, 19482 US-54, Wheatland, 417-282-6100, June 6, 13 and 20, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call ahead.
JOHNSON COUNTY: (Laura Miles)
Holden Senior Center, 204 W. Second St., Holden, 816-732-5757, June 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Warrensburg Senior Center, 445 E. Gay, Warrensburg, 660-747-2624, June 20, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Parkview Gardens Apartments, 411 E North St, Warrensburg, MO (Shery Fogle) 1-800-748-7826, June 4, 10 a.m. to noon
LAFAYETTE COUNTY: (Bertina Markworth)
Concordia Senior Center, 710 Main, Concordia, 660-463-7393, June 20, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Higginsville Senior Center, 21st and Walnut, Higginsville, 660-584-7040, June 27, 10 a.m. to noon
Margaret Gray Center, 811 C S. Business /highway 13, Lexington, 660-259-2025, June 19, 10 a.m. to noon
Odessa Senior Center, 217 S. Second St., Odessa, 816-633-4161, June 26, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
PETTIS COUNTY: (Joy Guymon)
Sedalia Senior Center, 312 S. Washington, Sedalia, 660-826-0713, June 20, 10 am. to noon
SALINE COUNTY: (Jacklyn Frerking)
Marshall Senior Center, 14 E. Morgan, Marshall, 660-886-9888, June 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on a walk-in basis
ST. CLAIR COUNTY: (Melanie Foster)
Rivers Crossing Life Center, 5215 Business Highway 13 NE, Osceola, 417-646-8292, June 11 and 25, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call ahead.
VERNON COUNTY: (Artricia Lowry)
Neal Center, 301 N. Main, Nevada, 417-667-5847, June 6, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 to 2 p.m.

Care Connection for Aging Services is a non-profit area agency on aging serving 13 West Central Missouri counties with a mission to provide opportunities to create healthy aging experiences. For more information, call 1-800-748-7826 or www.goaging.org

Date: May 17, 2019 | Category: News

Click here to see June’s Teleconnect schedule for Family Caregivers.

Date: May 16, 2019 | Category: News

Are you interested in learning how to live well with challenges such as high blood pressure or diabetes? If so, Care Connection for Aging Services has just the class for you.
Care Connection’s Concordia Senior Center is hosting a “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Disease” class beginning at 9 a.m. on June 5. The course consists of six weekly sessions of two and a half hours each. The classes will be at the center, 710 Main, in Concordia. Certified facilitators Shery Fogle and Liz Rooks will lead the classes. The sessions are free, but registration is required by calling Care Connection Lifestyles Specialist Shery Fogle at 1-800-748-7826.
Regina Haynie recently finished a six-week CDSMP class in Clinton, and says she would “absolutely” recommend the course to people who have chronic conditions.
Haynie lives with two chronic conditions, both diagnosed just after the death of her husband.
“People with chronic conditions feel isolated and alone,” Haynie said. “By getting us together in a group, we were able to share some of our concerns, open up about concerns, and learn how others deal with it. Then you know you are not alone.”
The proven practices for self-management are based on an ongoing series of studies conducted at Stanford University School of Medicine.
Topics include:
–Techniques to deal with problems such as frustration, fatigue, pain and isolation.
–Appropriate exercise for maintaining and improving strength, flexibility and endurance.
–Appropriate use of medications.
–Communicating effectively with family, friends, and health professionals.
–Nutrition.
–Decision making.
–Evaluation of new treatments.
Sharon and Walter Johnson, of Warsaw, also attended the Clinton class.
“For the two of us, it was more reinforcement we were doing the right thing,” said Sharon, who has lived with chronic pain for 31 years. “There were a lot of good resources.”
Materials, including the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions,” will be provided. The book contains information and tips to help people manage chronic conditions daily while doing the things they need and want to do.
Participants make weekly action plans, share experiences, and help each other solve problems they encounter in creating and carrying out their self-management program.
“Doing the weekly plans made us stop and think about what you are doing right and what you need to improve on,” Sharon Johnson said.
Walter Johnson lives with diabetes and high blood pressure. He said the course “made you be honest with yourself. You had to make yourself stick to the plan. It’s easy to set up a plan, for your own health, and your own future health, but it’s harder to stick to it and be honest with yourself.”

Date: May 15, 2019 | Category: News

Seniors will be able to add a little balance to their lives and diminish their fear of falling during a four-week course at the Salisbury Senior Center.
Care Connection for Aging Services will offer an eight-session course called “Matter of Balance,” from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays beginning June 3 at the Salisbury Senior Center, 304 Broadway, in Salisbury.
To register, call 1-800-748-7826. The course is being offered free to participants.
Three in 10 seniors fall each year, and about 20 percent of those are injured. Falls are a leading cause of injury and death among older people and often happen at home. Many can be prevented.
The class is meant to reduce the fear of falling and to increase activity among older adults. It was developed in accordance with research conducted by Boston University.
The participants will learn:
• To set goals for increasing activity.
• To view falls and the fear of falling as controllable.
• To exercise to create strength and balance.
• To reduce risk factors for falls.
Class participants can expect discussion, problem solving, skill building, assertiveness training, exercises and videos.
Nine of 10 participants in the nationally recognized Matter of Balance program said they are more comfortable talking about the fear of falling, planned to increase exercise, and would recommend the program to others.
Care Connection offers the program as part of its mission to opportunities to create healthy aging experiences. Care Connection for Aging Services, a non-profit area agency on aging, serves 13 West Central Missouri counties, including Chariton.